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Topic: can stuffed animals help with anxiety?

6 posts, 0 answered
  1. greendino
    greendino avatar
    4 posts
    18 January 2022

    i have recently been realy struggling with my anxiety and don’t know how to calm myself down. i like to keep myself warm and watered tightly, either with a blanket, curling up in a tight ball or both at once.

    i was thinking that if i purchased a stuffed animal or squishmallow i could hug that to give me a sense of calm and warmth.

    I was looking for anyone who might know if it helps for them before i buy one?

    thank you so much

    1 person found this helpful
  2. geoff
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    geoff avatar
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    18 January 2022 in reply to greendino

    Hello Greendino, a good question, and for some people, it can help you with a sense of security and can reduce negative feelings, such as loneliness and anxiety and provide something for you to talk to which may produce calmness and a way to relax.

    Remember as a young kid we all had some teddy bear to hold onto to make us go to sleep or take with us when going somewhere we weren't sure of, so the same principle applies when you're an adult.

    Take care.

    Geoff.

    1 person found this helpful
  3. HappyHelper88
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    18 January 2022 in reply to greendino
    Hello there

    I have found curling into a ball or the fetal position reduced anxiety and research has also shown this is effective
    I also had stuffed animals i hugged and it helped but now i have a puppy and i cuddle him, hope this helps
    1 person found this helpful
  4. romantic_thi3f
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    romantic_thi3f avatar
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    19 January 2022 in reply to greendino

    Hi greendino,

    Thank you for your question and what a great strategy. For me personally, I actually use a weighted blanket which has been brilliant for me. Although I do know of so many people who use stuffed animals- some big, some small, some squishy, some soft, some shiny, some rough, some smooth. I also know that you can buy weighted stuffed toys as well, and some toys even mimic dogs (using AAA batteries so it mimics a heartbeat).

    I definitely recommend having a look around and seeing what works for you and what you need.

    rt

    1 person found this helpful
  5. Ggrand
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    19 January 2022 in reply to greendino

    Hello greendino,

    I have 2 little very real dogs that I so much would have loved to cuddle up to at night or through the day when I feel overwhelmed with sadness, anxiety or depression....unfortunately they won’t keep still, want pats all the time...

    My last admittance to hospital I took along a stuffed teddy bear and cuddled that through the night...I even took teddy to my physiatrist visits while in the hospital....Teddy was my security blanket* while away from home....

    I do have a medium size stuffed Unicorn 🦄 that has very pretty colours and also a pink stuffed Rabbit 🐇....I cuddle up to them most nights and even, umm talk* to them when I’m down...they are great listeners....

    I know stuffed toys are not for everyone, but for me they do help me...I suppose it’s something that you will have to try to see if having a cuddly soft toy companion works for you...

    My fur babies do get the first cuddles and lots of pats before my Unicorn and Rabbit of course...then when my hands are tired and I’m ready for sleep, I reach out to my stuffed fluffy soft stuffed animals....

    My kindest thoughts lovely greendino....

    Grandy........

    ps....(yes I am a grandma and a great grandma)...age doesn’t matter..it’s all about what works for you...and what comforts you...🧸🦄🐇..

  6. mmMekitty
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    3415 posts
    19 January 2022 in reply to greendino

    Hi Greendino,

    I used to have a few stuffed animals. One in particular was a purple bear. I agree it gave me a sense of security, of having something to hold, something soft & from the moment I saw it in the store, I was drawn to. It was the only purple bear, & its price tag was missing, but eventually the staff member found a price, so I would not be leaving it there, but taking it home with me. I named it straight away, too. I guess I formed the sort of bond like I had with some stuffed animals when I was little. & when cuddled it I did feel my anxiety easing. I took it on a trip with me, too. That was also a time of anxiety, so it was great to have it.

    I also found if I carried a small stuffed animal, small enough for a bag, or pocket even, was good when I felt I needed something to focus on while anxiety was high.

    Having my cat was great, but she didn't like being held much. When she lay at my side, or feet, & purring, I found that so very soothing. Patting her, while lying together was even more soothing, I imagined for her as well as me, as she would drift off into sleep while I was patting her.

    Now, a cushion, or holding onto a fist-full of sheet or blanket is enough.

    I have had these little soft cushions from the hospital, & even when I am not using them for my physical comfort, I find them psychologically comforting. I often tuck one under my chin when I am going to sleep.

    mmMekitty

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