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Topic: Hi im new

16 posts, 0 answered
  1. angelkattie
    angelkattie avatar
    0 posts
    3 September 2019
    I think i have depression i havent been to a professional and minor anxiety i have collapsed once overthinking and crying and not being able to breathe for no reason. Im not sure how this forum really works so if someone wanted to help me that would be great
  2. Croix
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    Croix avatar
    1232 posts
    3 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Dear Angelkattie~

    Welcome here, don't worry about how the forum works, you are off to a great start.

    Without anything to compare it to many people become uncertain if they have depression/anxiety. This is a pity as often an early visit to the doctor and a course of treatment can be pretty effective. Leaving things longer makes it a bit harder

    Beyond Blue has a self-test guide. It is not a diagnosis, just an indicator. Your score is looked at and advice given as a result, generally the higher the score the more likely you are experiencing depression and/or anxiety.

    You do not have to rely upon this, in fact it often does not harm at all to book an extended appointment with a GP and say what has been happening, the overthinking and crying -and the collapse -sound pretty horrible.

    I've had those and in my case it was depression/anxiety. I made a mistake of thinking things would get better by themselves, but as time went on I simply got worse. I only improved when I finally got competent medical help. The not being able to breath - which sounds a bit like a panic attack - was very scary.

    Now I'm good.

    May I ask if you have someone to support you? A family member or freind perhaps? It does make a deference to be able to speak frankly about how you are to someone that cares. I have my partner.

    Please come back and say some more, we are here to understand and help

    Croix

  3. geoff
    Life Member
    • Awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
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    geoff avatar
    3259 posts
    4 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Hello Angelkattie, and a warm welcome to the site.

    It's not easy to post your first comment because there is some hesitation in what you should write, but you have done it and that's great and can I say that I'm really sorry for how you are feeling.

    The self test mentioned by Croix is in the 'The Facts' above and it's called the K-10 test.

    What you can do on this forum is to write anything else you want to tell us, although we aren't qualified doctors, we have struggled through our own type of depression/anxiety ourselves and know how awful this illness is and what it can do to us.`

    If you can do the K-10 test several times, but not straight after each other, but different times and days until you can book an appointment with your doctor.

    Take the K-10 results with you and perhaps write down on some paper what and how you are feeling.

    This just helps you when the doctor asks you 'how can I help you', all you need to do is pace what you have done over to them.

    Would love to hear back from you, when possible.

    Take care.

    Geoff.

  4. angelkattie
    angelkattie avatar
    0 posts
    4 September 2019 in reply to Croix
    Thankyou for your advice. I took the test a while ago when i thought i was depressed and it reccomended i see a gp but i dont want to tell my family because they react weirdly to mental health because they had it in the past and dont want me to have it so they think if we dont talk about it it wont happen. I have a friend who i talk to it about sometimes but i havent been able to trust her as much lately and everytime i talk about it she goes on about how shes in more pain (her elbow broke once so she always brings it up saying shes the one whos in pain) I text my thoughts to myself just so i can get it out of my system. Thankyou for being welcoming
  5. angelkattie
    angelkattie avatar
    0 posts
    4 September 2019 in reply to geoff

    I have taken the test a few times in the past and recently and got high most times. I dont feel comfortable going to my gp because my parents dont like to talk about mental health and i dont want to bother anyone with the hastle of thinking about me. I dont want to ask my year advisor to go to the school councelor because i used to be this very happy kid that would always smile and i feel people would either not believe me if i told them or would be confused and change their image they had of me.

    Sorry i went a bit off topic there but thankyou for replying

  6. Croix
    Community Champion
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    1232 posts
    4 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Dear Angelkattie~

    I'm glad you have taken the test, as Geoff recommends more than once is sensible.

    I'm not sure it is a matter of your parent's attitudes as it is of dealing with a very real situation. High scores indicate action should be taken. Showing the scores to a doctor and explaining how you are feeling is normally enough to get things started.

    I know you may have a reputation for being "this very happy kid that would always smile" however I would be surprised if nobody had noticed when you have had difficulties, crying, difficulty breathing (and as a result difficulty talking), plus a collapse wold have been a real worry.

    If you think it is hard to get help just pick up the phone, For those under 25 there is the Kids Help Line (1800 55 1800) where you can talk or web-chat - is a pretty good starting point.

    Unlike many such places you can talk to the same person more than once if you want (when they are on shift of course). Thy are experienced and pretty realistic. They understand problems with parents.

    If you make my mistake you leave things until they get a lot worse, I don't recommend it!

    Croix

  7. angelkattie
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    0 posts
    8 September 2019 in reply to Croix

    whats the best way to introduce the conversation with my parents or someone i trust?

  8. Croix
    Community Champion
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    1232 posts
    8 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Dear Angelkattie~

    A good question, one an awful lot of people have asked. Apart from picking the time and place I guess the most important thing is choosing someone that cares about you, enough to get out of their comfort zone.

    Beyond Blue has taken this problem quite seriously, I suggest you read:

    https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/have-the-conversation/talk-about-it 

    This has some pretty fair advice. If you cannot find the page please sing out.

    Croix

    1 person found this helpful
  9. geoff
    Life Member
    • Awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    geoff avatar
    3259 posts
    9 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Hello Angelkattie, as Croix has said a good question.

    Just because your parents don't like to talk about mental illness, still doesn't mean that they won't be thinking about it anyway and doesn't necessarily stop them from worrying about you.

    They will be concerned about how you are behaving and might say 'you used to be a happy person, but now you're not', that's the key to begin the conversation, maybe start off by talking about a friend first and then say 'that's how I'm feeling'.

    Pick out a story in the paper where someone important has backed off from doing what they always loved to do, say a footballer who has taken time off because they're struggling from mental illness.

    We can't hide away from any type of mental illness, sure we can pretend, but there will be something you do that's out of the ordinary that will be noticeable.

    Pick a time when it's more appropriate and just mention something on the outside that can lead to a discussion.

    Best wishes.

    Geoff.

  10. - Brayden -
    - Brayden -  avatar
    0 posts
    11 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Hey there! And welcome to Beyondblue.

    First of all, you should be very proud of yourself, being able to explain this kind of stuff can be difficult. While doctors might suggest anti-depressants, I suggest you consider trying what I do. Every morning when I hop out of my bed, I get up and say to myself in my head - "You are incredible, you can change the world". Its a little bit of motivation to get me through. Another thing I would suggest is Meditation. It can be pretty scary when you lose your breath, and to be fair it makes sense to panic. When it occurs, I suggest you stop what your doing, sit down anywhere possible and say to yourself "Everything will be alright". Then try to take a deep breath (through your mouth) This can usually occur when you are stressed and concerned about something.

    So if this happens, its a pretty good indication that you need to walk away for a bit. I'm assuming your young (Like me) as per your conversation with Geoff and Croix.

    Ask your teacher or your school counsellor and talk about it to them if you're a bit shy about talking about it to your parents. As they have been around kids/teens for an amount of time they would understand your situation.

    Give me a shout if you need any more help or anything else to talk about!

    - Brayden -

  11. angelkattie
    angelkattie avatar
    0 posts
    11 September 2019 in reply to geoff
    Ive decided to try and talk to my year advisert to go to the counceler. I dont know when im still thinking about what to say but i think starting there is the place with the smallest ripple effect. Ill probably end up going next term if im honest with you knowing me
  12. geoff
    Life Member
    • Awarded by beyondblue for providing outstanding peer support to the online community over a period of 3+ years.
    • A member of beyondblue's blueVoices community
    geoff avatar
    3259 posts
    12 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Hi Angelkattie, and welcome Brayden.

    Can I suggest you divide what you want to say into 2 parts onto a piece of paper, where the first part you feel comfortable talking about with the counsellor and the second part which could be those difficult issues and when you connected with that person, then you could talk about them.

    It doesn't have to be in one session, that's entirely up to you.

    Let us know how you get on, only if you want to.

    Take care.

    Geoff.

    2 people found this helpful
  13. angelkattie
    angelkattie avatar
    0 posts
    12 September 2019 in reply to geoff
    Thanks fot the suggestion, itl help me be more organised and be a bit less scared.
  14. Croix
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    Croix avatar
    1232 posts
    12 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Dear Angelkattie~

    I think that Geoff has given you some good advice, in other words to write things down - taking your time to do so, then handing over the paper to the councilor. I've done this with doctors and have found it very helpful (so have they as they have something to work from)

    I get to say everything without being flustered or embarrassed by trying to explain face to face, in fact I've just has to answer questions to amplify what I wrote (which I've normally written point-form)

    I'm not sure how much you have to say to your year adviser to get an appointment with a counselor. Simply saying it is a serious and troubling ongoing matter - without going into details may well be enough.

    When you see the counselor you simply had over your situation in point-form (well, I have used point form anyway).

    Everyone is different, I used this method not only to make the consultation easier for me, but also so I did not chicken out on some things - too late when the paper has been handed over, which was a surprising relief.

    If you simply can't say everything all at once then just say there is more, but you can't talk about it -and say why. That way the councilor will know it is serious and needs to keep on going.

    When you do it? I guess when you think there is a good opportunity, hopefully as soon as possible, not leaving it until next term as your life needs to get better right now. I left things far too long and had more difficulties as a result, please don't make my mistake.

    Do you think this is something you might be able to do?

    Croix

  15. angelkattie
    angelkattie avatar
    0 posts
    16 September 2019 in reply to Croix
    im not really sure, things get intense busy in regards to school around this time of the term and she is always busy with no time and is always angry and unaprochable/intimidating at this time. Ive been feeling better lately but im waiting for my emotions to crash thats y i keep saying ill leave it to later because right now i dont feel how i felt a week ago but i know i will feel it soon
  16. Croix
    Community Champion
    • Outstanding members who have volunteered their time to support others here on the forums
    Croix avatar
    1232 posts
    17 September 2019 in reply to angelkattie

    Dear Angelkattie~

    I'm sorry she is so intimidating and angry at school - that is definitely not the sort of person you want.

    While I can understand you putting things off because it is bearable at the moment, however that's the proper time to take steps. Not difficult ones but some, so if you do crash it's all there for you already. Trying to explain and seek help when you are really down is too big an ask -at least it was for me.

    Do you think that is a sensible thing to do?

    I know I'm repeating myself (sorry) , however it's because I know they are good. Have a talk or web-chat to the Kids Help Line (1800 55 1800). They will listen and help. They are not just there for a crisis.

    Croix

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